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How to clean a French Press(FULLY EXPLAINED easy method)

The french press is an excellent brewer to use, however, it cannot always work fine if is not properly maintained. In this post, let’s talk about how to clean a french press the right way. It’s really easy to do!

How to clean a french press the easy way

What you’ll need:

  • Running water
  • Detergent and a sponge
  • Towel or dish rack
  • A spoon or spatula

1. Empty coffee grounds

Once you finish brewing, the first step to clean the brewer is to remove the used grounds out of the beaker. This sounds simple, but it actually comes with somewhat of pain.

Touch the breaker’s bottom and gently lift it over the compost and garbage to throw the majority of the grounds out. There are some grounds which may get stuck, so scoop them all out with a spatula or wooden spoon.

Be careful not to throw grounds down the drain! Throw the grounds in the trash or in a compost bin.

2. Disassemble and rinse

Disassemble the plunger. Grab the top of the plunger with one hand and the three filters with the other, and unscrew. The top of the plunger and the three filters should separate.

Note that the grounds are normally trapped among the three disks, so remember to separate them and do a deep rinse with warm or hot water to avoid any possible build-up.

Rinse

3. Gently scrub

Do a gentle scrubbing of everything separately to properly clean your french press: the plunger, the beaker, and the filter screens with a soft sponge or brush to make sure that no coffee residue remains. You can use a little bit of dish soap to help kill any bacteria and eliminate odors.

You can also use a mix of baking soda and vinegar as it is an effective cleaning agent.

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After everything is scrubbed clean, rinse through all the components to make sure that no soap is left.

4. Air Dry Or Towel Dry

Carefully place all the press parts on a towel or drying rack for air dry. If you do not want to wait some minutes, then you can choose to towel dry and then reassemble.

 

 

 

5. Reassemble the french press

The final step to clean your french press coffee maker is assembling it again: it looks a bit more complicated than it actually is!

  1. Slide the recently-cleaned beaker into its correct holder(if it’s removable, otherwise this step does not apply).
  2. Put the retaining disk on a flat surface. This part includes a screw for attachment to the plunger later
  3. Put the filter screen on top of the retaining disk top. This disk is followed by the spring disk. The spring disk is on the top and the filter with the retaining disk is at the bottom
  4. As the disks are correctly stacked, securely screw the lid
  5. Now your plunger is reassembled and ready to be put back in the french press.

Related

Caring for your french press

As you saw, cleaning a French Press basically means cleaning the three main elements, namely, the glass (sometimes plastic, even stainless) and housings, the plunger with the enclosed lid and the stand, of which the plunger can be taken out into some small pieces for a more thorough cleaning.

Below are some more tips to note:

  • Always brew with coarse ground coffee. Fine or medium ground coffee can result you in gritty cups and form clogs in the plunger
  • After brewing with the French press, use a soft cloth or sponge to gently clean it. Do not use harsh scouring pads or metallic pads because they may scratch the beaker which can cause cracks after certain period of time.
  • Do not put the coffee grounds down the sink, but discard them in the trash can or a compost bin
  • Do not use tools like steel brushes or hard cleaners as they can scratch the press’s surface, regardless of the surface’s material
  • Clean and dry thoroughly, then store it in a cool, dry place if you’re stowing it for a long time
  • Filter screens are available with some French Press replacement parts, so if necessary, you can use them to complete plunger sets

Note: Getting replacement parts

As time passes, your french press will undergo wear and tear. In that case, make it better by replacing the worn parts. The parts that can be replaced without requiring you to invest in a new press include beakers, filter screens, and coffee plungers, and most of these are easily available.

Beakers can break with just one slip, but luckily, they come with various sizes and well-matched with any standard press. The filter screens have the same convenience. So it is recommended replacing your filter screens once or twice a year for better maintenance.

Bodum’s online store sells replacement parts.

Frequently asked questions

How do you get mold out of a french press?

If your french press becomes moldy for any reason, you can remove the mold with a mixture of hot water and soap. A lot of the mold can just be rinsed off under the tap, and a thorough cleaning with hot water and soap will kill any remaining spores. Make sure to take apart the filter screens and scrub them individually, too. You can also soak the filter screens in a mix of warm water and soap or warm water and baking soda for a few hours. Don’t use an acid like vinegar or citric acid as acids will react with the metal.

Can I just rinse a french press after using it?

Sure! For everyday use, you can get away with just rinsing. Make sure all the grounds are knocked loose from between the filters, though.

How often should I deep clean a french press?

To keep a french press in tip top shape, try to deep clean it once every one or two weeks. You can also just disassemble everything and put it in the dishwasher.

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About Shabbir

Shabbir is the Chief Caffeine Officer at Coffee In My Veins. When he's not weighing out coffee beans for his next brew, you can find him writing about his passion: coffee.

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